Counter

Pageviews last month

Tuesday, 6 September 2016

Can a mathematical formula improve my chances of winning the lottery? and other relevant questions

I've written before under the labels of greed and deception, but my topic today is specifically on Jared Wilson the lottery winner. Run a search on that character string, and you are likely to find that the first few hits--even those claiming to review the program--are nothing more than links back to the infomercial that first introduced me to Jared. In other words, this is a highly sophisticated scam; even searching on 'Lotto Destroyer Scam' takes you back to the exact same site. Someone has gone to a tremendous amount of work to part you and your $147.

So the question: Does it Work? still needs to be addressed. Which I will now do, as a public service and without any requests for remuneration.

First of all, you need to know that there is no such person as Jared Wilson who won the lottery six times. That's just a hook to get you to the website, where you go on to read that 'Jared' actually wins the lotto at least once a month.

Stop right there. If he's pulling in so many thousands of dollars in lotto winnings, why would he share his secret with you, even if you pay him $147? If his system is guaranteed to turn you into a winner (as he says it is), then why isn't he charging at least $50,000 for it, to forestall his future loss in winnings as the pot is further diluted every time someone else starts claiming a regular share of it?

One thing we know, 'Jared' isn't the mathematician that he claims to be, or he would have realized this.  Instead, 'Jared' is a shrewd psychologist, one who well understands The Gamblers Fallacy and knows 'he' can make way more more money by selling a scam than by playing the numbers.

We also know that 'Jared' has a lot of legal insight, as 'he' is running a scam that won't work for the majority of people that use it. Were his product actually refundable, you can bet he wouldn't stay in business for long. Obviously the process of getting one's money back is about as easy as winning the lottery without using the system. They know way more about keeping your money than you do about getting it back.

One more thing. 'Jared' obviously worked hard to sound like an American, but there's just a enough broken English in his copy to reveal an overseas connection. Not to mention the total disconnect in logic that a Pakistani gas station owner would be mad at him for winning the lottery five times! I guess 'Jared' expects you not to know that whoever sells a winning ticket gets paid right along with the purchaser.

So, yes, you read it here. Jared Wilson (or whatever he's calling himself this week) and the entire Lottery Destroyer is nothing more than a scheme to part you and your money. Lotteries don't hate him, they love him--he's bringing in a lot more business as people throw good money after bad before finally realizing that they were duped.

Oh, and those people who do win back-to-back lotteries? There's a reason for their success, and it's a simple mathematical formula: use your million in winnings to buy another million tickets, and you're statistically guaranteed to win again. Sadly, most lotto winners use their winnings to keep right on playing--such is the nature of an addiction.

Want to get rich, and stay rich? Then don't buy lottery tickets or lotto winning schemes; sell them instead.

The same could be said for membership in multi-level marketing schemes, as they work pretty much the same way. But at least you get a hopefully useful product for your pains.

2 comments:

  1. Just "Thank you"

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you very much! You're right I could not find any info on this and it kept reverting back to the same website :-) thanks for being there and saving us of our hard-earned money.

    ReplyDelete

One comment per viewer, please--unless participating in a dialogue.